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View across Llangynwyd valleys

Welcome to the Official Llangynwyd Middle Community Council Website

The Council hopes that you find the information contained on the website to be useful and informative and Councillors look forward to receiving any suggestions you would like to make about issues, ideas or concerns that you would like the Council to consider.

Gobeithia’r Cyngor eich bod yn cael defnydd mawr o’r wybodaeth ar ein gwefan, ac mae’n Cynghorwyr yn edrych ymlaen at dderbyn unrhyw argymhellion neu awgrymiadau ynglyn â syniadau, materion neu bryderon a hoffech i’r Cyngor eu hystyried.’Gobeithia’r Cyngor eich bod yn cael defnydd mawr o’r wybodaeth ar ein gwefan, ac mae’n Cynghorwyr yn edrych ymlaen at dderbyn unrhyw argymhellion neu awgrymiadau ynglyn â syniadau, materion neu bryderon a hoffech i’r Cyngor eu hystyried.

 

About Llangynwyd Middle

The community is the northern part of the old parish of Llangynwyd, and was created by government reorganisation in 1974. The majority of Llangynwyd Middle is made up of hilly farmland and is sparsely populated. The River Llynfi flows through the community alongside the A4063, the main road linking Maesteg in the north and Bridgend town in the south.

The community of Llangynwyd Middle makes up most of the old parish of Llangynwyd once known as yr Hen Blwyf (the old parish). One of the first areas of upland Glamorgan to come under the rule of the Normans, it became known as Tir Iarll (the earl’s land) and was believed to be annexed by Robert, Earl of Gloucester. A castle was built there in the 12th century, though the fortification, now known as Llangynwyd Castle, was first mentioned in 1246. The castle was destroyed in 1257, probably by Llywelyn ap Gruffudd. The castle was partially rebuilt by Gilbert de Clare during the 1260s, but was again sacked in the riots of 1294-5. This time the castle was left ruinous and today only basic masonry and foundation stones can be seen.

Despite falling under early Norman rule, the area around Llangynwyd remained rooted in Welsh traditions, and became a centre of Welsh literary tradition, and is connected with Welsh medieval poets, such as Rhys BrydyddRhisiart ap Rhys and Gwilym Tew. During the 14th century, a church dedicated to St Cynwyd was raised, which gives its name to the community. The church, built with a square unbuttressed western tower, was greatly restored between 1891-3 by G.E. Halliday. Ann Maddocks the ‘Maid of Cefn Ydfa’, is buried in the churchyard.

PRIVACY NOTICE

When someone visits our website we may collect standard internet log information and details of visitor behaviour patterns. We do this to find out things such as the number of visitors to the various parts of the site. We collect this information in a way which does not identify anyone. We do not make any attempt to find out the identities of those visiting our website. We will not associate any data gathered from this site with any personally-identifying information from any source. If we do want to collect personally-identifiable information through our website, we will be upfront about this. We will make it clear when we collect personal information and will explain what we intend to do with it.